Whilst I was aware of its existence and that of the publisher - Larry O'Hara - I had never seen a copy of the journal, 'Notes from the Borderland'.

I came across issue 10 in a radical bookshop and had a quick flick through. Whilst it seemed a bit expensive at £4.50, it was a huge 86 pages long, contained no adverts, and most important of all it looked really interesting. For those not familiar with the publication, they describe themselves as follows:

"Welcome to Britain's premier parapolitical investigative magazine Notes from the Borderland (NFB). We have been producing the magazine since 1997 but some published material before then. Our political perspective is Left/Green, but we welcome truth-tellers, whatever their affiliation. Research interests include the secret state (MI5/MI6/Special Branch) & their assets, including those in the media. We are resolutely anti-fascist, and to that end investigate the far right and state infiltration of various milieus. In a shallow age where many TV programmes and print/internet stories are spoon-fed to servile journalists/bloggers by shadowy interests, NFB stands out as genuine investigative research."
Issue 10 contains articles by several authors. The stand-out articles are, Gareth Williams: Murdered Twice, the Searchlight-Hope Not Hate split, and the BNP 2012 election analysis.

What immediately stands out is the attention to detail in teach article. They have been written by people who have gathered a large amount of information and intelligence on the subject in hand, who provide extensive evidence / footnotes, and who clearly 'know their onions'.

By the time I had finished reading the issue £4.50 seemed like a bargain, and I wanted more. Luckily the last page gave details of how to order the 9 previous issues that date back to 1997. I made contact via their website, and for £33 I received all previous issues, and issue 11 (when it is published).

I received a parcel within days, and to my surprise they had kindly sent me a couple of freebies - 'Turning up the Heat: MI5 after the Cold War', and 'A Lie too Far: Searchlight, Hepple, and the Left'. I was not to be disappointed - as all 9 back issues are to the same high standard as issue 10, albeit a bit shorter, and cover a diverse range of subjects - including useful updates of stories that have been covered in previous issues.

I purchase many political publications every month, most of which I throw in the bin when I have read them. This is not the case with Notes from the Borderland - which occupies a permanent space on my bookshelves. I really cannot recommend Notes from the Borderland enough. It is investigative journalism of the highest order - which provides a unique insight into many controversial issues and individuals around the left, the far-right, and the secret state.

I challenge anyone to read an issue and tell me they are disappointed.

Notes from the Borderland can be purchased from radical bookshops, or via their website -  http://www.borderland.co.uk/.

Contact Address

BM Box 4769
London
United Kingdom
WC1N 3XX

Phone: +44 7775 964367

Email: nfbmagazine@yahoo.co.uk

About NFB Magazine

Welcome to Britain's premier parapolitical investigative magazine Notes from the Borderland (NFB). We have been producing the magazine since 1997 but some published material before then.

Our political perspective is Left/Green, but we welcome truth-tellers, whatever their affiliation. Research interests include the secret state (MI5/MI6/Special Branch, now SO15) & their assets, including those in the media. We are resolutely anti-fascist, and to that end investigate the far right and state infiltration of various milieus. In a shallow age where many TV programmes and print/internet stories are spoon-fed to servile journalists/bloggers by shadowy interests, NFB stands out as genuine investigative research. 

Take a chance--you won't be disappointed...

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